Category

Research

JavaScript for Kids

I’m learning JavaScript.

It’s a language I’ve never coded before although I have used/manipulated it on numerous occasions. I’m following Nick Morgan’s (skilldrick.co.uk) JavaScript for Kids as a learning guide and so far, so good.

The above (^) is my first piece of written JavaScript. Woohoo!

While I’m at it check out these impressive JavaScript creations:

http://fantasynth.com/

https://patatap.com/

https://cubeslam.com/

Check back again in a few weeks to see how me and my JS code are progressing…

 

VS Games 2018

Good news! We (Dr Bride Mallon, Dr Cornelia Connolly, and my-good-self) have had our research paper accepted for VS-GAMES 2018. Our paper focuses on the role of Assessment in Serious Alternate Reality Games.

The 10th International Conference on Virtual Worlds and Games for Serious Applications takes place from September 5th-7th in Würzburg, Germany.

The community of the VS-GAMES covers a broad variety of facets of virtual worlds and games including game design, software engineering, computer graphics, human-computer interaction techniques, pedagogical and psychological models and evaluations. The common denominator of the conference is that all of these different efforts and perspectives target serous application domains – from museum exhibitions over deep sea robotics interfaces to training and rehabilitation.

VS-GAMES 2018

EdTech 2018

Alongside my colleague Shane D’Arcy, we presented at EdTech2018 in Carlow IT on our experiences of utilising Adobe Connect in separate modules for the first time.

Image result for irish learning technology association

These practical modules on programming and animation theory have been previously taught in a face-to-face context but are now included in a part-time blended programme, 80% of which is delivered online. Classes are delivered two evening per week to approximately 15 students (each session), most of whom are working full-time. Our presentation considered the benefits and the limitations of the virtual classroom from the teacher’s perspective. In particular, we outlined some simple techniques used to counter challenges in a number of aspects of the virtual classroom experience such as feedback and interaction, teaching approaches, body language and facial expressions, online activities, “wait time” and “think time”.